EDITORIAL: When is a PR pro not so? Ask PRSA

Imagine, for a moment, that you are Steve Bullock, CFO of Cerrell Associates. You’re a 13-year veteran of a well regarded agency who has led account teams, coordinated events, pitched the media, written extensively and developed database tools for your firm. But according to the PRSA, you don’t practice public relations.

Imagine, for a moment, that you are Steve Bullock, CFO of Cerrell Associates. You’re a 13-year veteran of a well regarded agency who has led account teams, coordinated events, pitched the media, written extensively and developed database tools for your firm. But according to the PRSA, you don’t practice public relations.

Imagine, for a moment, that you are Steve Bullock, CFO of Cerrell

Associates. You’re a 13-year veteran of a well regarded agency who has

led account teams, coordinated events, pitched the media, written

extensively and developed database tools for your firm. But according to

the PRSA, you don’t practice public relations.



Never mind that you’ve attended PRSA seminars and even won an award from

the group’s Los Angeles chapter (in 1997, for ’Best Brochure’). You are

not, as the organization wrote in denying your application for

membership, ’engaged in the paid professional practice of public

relations,’ simply because your title, chief financial officer, is an

administrative one.



Sadly, the Bullock controversy seems emblematic of the pettiness and

narrow thinking that has repeatedly marred the industry’s supposed

leading organization. Why anyone with even the flimsiest of connections

to the PR profession would be denied a spot in the PRSA doesn’t make

sense.



If there’s no place for Bullock in the PRSA as presently constituted,

make room for him. The group boasts 16 professional interest sections;

why not found a 17th for administrative issues?



The PRSA has better ways to spend its money than playing at

semantics.



It’s discouraging that the PRSA, which represents a profession desperate

to be heard by the prized C-level audience, is denying one of its own

C-level executives recognition among its ranks.



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