Campaigns: Product Promotion - Dow puts stock in Wall Street ’toons

Since signing on with The Wall Street Journal in 1950, cartoon editor Charles Preston estimates he’s waded through some 2.5 million offerings; 175 of those that have appeared in the paper have been selected for a new collection. From ponytails to e-mails, the book draws from a 50-year history of poking fun at trends in the workplace.

Since signing on with The Wall Street Journal in 1950, cartoon editor Charles Preston estimates he’s waded through some 2.5 million offerings; 175 of those that have appeared in the paper have been selected for a new collection. From ponytails to e-mails, the book draws from a 50-year history of poking fun at trends in the workplace.

Since signing on with The Wall Street Journal in 1950, cartoon

editor Charles Preston estimates he’s waded through some 2.5 million

offerings; 175 of those that have appeared in the paper have been

selected for a new collection. From ponytails to e-mails, the book draws

from a 50-year history of poking fun at trends in the workplace.



To promote the November 1 launch, Dow Jones Corporate Communications

enlisted the aid of the Journal’s Marketing Services Group, as well as a

handful of outside agencies and independent party planners.





Strategy



Surveys have shown that 80% of the Journal’s readers read Preston’s

selections.



Couple that with Dow Jones’ deep pockets and long arms and you have a

winning combination. Vickee Adams, Dow Jones’ director of corporate

communications, says that, in addition to selling the book and

publicizing Preston’s 50 years at the helm, ’We wanted to demonstrate

that The Wall Street Journal does have a sense of humor.’ The key to

accomplishing these goals involved the careful staging of a number of

launch events.





Tactics



A pre-campaign direct mailing was circulated to 50,000 Journal

subscribers.



Encouraged by the positive responses, a PR team was assembled. It began

orchestrating a publicity blitz, including advertising and press release

distribution via fax and e-mail. At the same time, a cartoon gallery

included in the Journal’s interactive online edition was being well

received.



Plans were then set in motion to publicize a launch party at the World

Financial Center’s North Bridge in New York, held from November 1

through 19 and promoted by The Bruce Cohen Group. A later promotional

party and showing was also planned for the International Museum of

Cartoon Art in Boca Raton, FL, assisted by Kaye Communications.



The New York promotion did hit one snag: the invitation listed the wrong

contact number; Dow Jones staffers had to scramble to re-send the

invites to the entire list.





Results



’The PR campaign was a very important factor in the success of the

book,’ says editor Preston. The initial run of 5,000 books sold out

quickly.



To date, the book has sold 10,000 copies through booksellers and an

additional 4,000 through an 800 number, says Adams. Tens of thousands of

visitors passed through the New York exhibit each day - a number Adams

expects the longer showing in Florida, from November through February,

to exceed.



’One of the side effects was it introduced the Journal to a whole group

of people who are unaware that the publication is more than business and

financial coverage,’ says Melanie Kirkpatrick, assistant editor of the

Journal’s editorial page.





Future



’This book has grown legs of its own,’ says Adams. In addition to the

several thousand copies in circulation, she says booksellers have placed

orders for at least 7,500 more copies for corporate gift catalogs and

specialty holidays such as Fathers’ Day. Once the exhibit wraps up in

Boca, Kirkpatrick says it will go on tour to business schools around the

country.



Client: Dow Jones & Company PR Team: Dow Jones Corporate Communications;

Wall Street Journal Marketing Communications; Bruce Cohen Group; Kaye

Communications; The World Financial Center Arts & Events Program

Campaign: Promotion of ’The Wall Street Journal Portfolio of Business

Cartoons’

Time Frame: July to October 1999

Budget: About dollars 100,000



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