MTV Generation looks to parents for political views

CHICAGO: Political spin doctors who think the best way to reach young voters is through MTV appearances and similar Gen X- and Y-minded activities might need to rethink their strategy.

CHICAGO: Political spin doctors who think the best way to reach young voters is through MTV appearances and similar Gen X- and Y-minded activities might need to rethink their strategy.

CHICAGO: Political spin doctors who think the best way to reach

young voters is through MTV appearances and similar Gen X- and Y-minded

activities might need to rethink their strategy.



New research from Golin/Harris has revealed that parents are the most

trusted source of political information for this audience. The findings

stemmed from a recent poll of Golin’s College Campus Panel, a group of

90 students between ages 18 and 29.



Asked who they trust as a source of political information, respondents

ranked their parents first, with an average 4.21 response (on a

one-to-five scale). Teachers came in second with a 3.54, followed by

newspapers (3.44) and magazines (3.08). Friends received a lowly

3.01.



’The message is that parents are important vectors in communicating with

kids,’ said Golin SVP and director of research Phil Kawior.



Given that the youths polled grew up with the Internet, it was

surprising that the Web received a 2.59 rating, only slightly ahead of

TV (2.51) and behind politicians (2.72). Political ads rated a 1.84,

ranking above only psychics and astrologers (1.17).



While noting that the group is not a scientific sample of all Americans

in that age range, Kawior said the responses provide interesting

insights into how young people view the world. ’They trust in

traditional means of communications, such as newspapers and magazines,’

he noted.



Golin put its campus panel together about a year ago. The firm is hoping

to expand the group and use it for more in-depth research in the future.



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