Travel pros admit validity of video footage failings

NEW YORK: Travel PR specialists admitted last week that NBC producer Peter Greenberg’s criticism of video footage submitted for a Today show feature was valid.

NEW YORK: Travel PR specialists admitted last week that NBC producer Peter Greenberg’s criticism of video footage submitted for a Today show feature was valid.

NEW YORK: Travel PR specialists admitted last week that NBC

producer Peter Greenberg’s criticism of video footage submitted for a

Today show feature was valid.



Greenberg, whose comments appeared on Jim Romensko’s Media News Web

site, said that a number of spring travel specials would have made it

into the Today show feature had PR and marketing pros invested in better

quality video footage. Among those he singled out for criticism were the

Carlson Leisure Group (which sent a reel featuring embarrassing tourists

in Hawaii), Sandals Resorts (which sent the ’cheesiest’ video of the

year), the State of Idaho, the Allegro resort and the Alaska tourism

board.



In the e-mail, Greenberg - who works for a variety of travel outlets

besides NBC - wrote, ’Given the choice of either admitting they had no

video, or biting the budget bullet and actually hiring a good news crew

and shooting broadcast beta, time-coded b-roll, they succeeded in

angering my producers with garbage.’



In response, Sandals’ newly appointed NY-based PR agency admitted

culpability.



’We are a new PR firm for Sandals. We sent the same documentary footage

we send everyone, but shame on us for not meeting their needs,’ said

Patrice Tanaka & Co. travel group EVP John Frazier. ’We are willing and

able to shoot new footage. It’s on the agenda.’



Carlson Leisure Group, based in Minnesota, blamed the low quality of its

submission on tight deadlines. ’We didn’t have any footage, but we

scrambled to get some together,’ explained PR director Steve Loucks.



’We don’t normally provide video on special travel deals.’



Loucks, however, added that stock footage of Hawaii should have been

relatively easy for the Today show to find, a point echoed by former New

York Times travel writer David Saltman. Saltman told Media News that

Today should be paying for its own footage: ’Accepting house-produced

footage is even worse than taking travel junkets.’



Greenberg clarified his comments by saying, ’I did not make the

statements as NBC policy, but as someone who represents a number of

outlets.’



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