EDITORIAL: Press for PR ethics is no bad thing

When The New York Times reported on the results of PRWeek’s ethics survey (PRWeek, May 1), the CEO of a leading PR agency, meeting at the Counselors’ Academy in Arizona, called on his fellow professionals to help in a ’financial boycott’ of PRWeek.

When The New York Times reported on the results of PRWeek’s ethics survey (PRWeek, May 1), the CEO of a leading PR agency, meeting at the Counselors’ Academy in Arizona, called on his fellow professionals to help in a ’financial boycott’ of PRWeek.

When The New York Times reported on the results of PRWeek’s ethics

survey (PRWeek, May 1), the CEO of a leading PR agency, meeting at the

Counselors’ Academy in Arizona, called on his fellow professionals to

help in a ’financial boycott’ of PRWeek.



There was no complaint when the PRWeek story ran. In fact, many pros

rang to applaud us for addressing this issue in a balanced way. But it

seems that when the issue became a story for a wider audience, PRWeek

was suddenly ’damaging’ the reputation of PR by highlighting ’the worst

aspects’ of the profession.



PRWeek makes no apology for the fact that it produces editorial that is

interesting enough for the major media to cover. We also think that an

industry that is enjoying unprecedented growth ought to be able to take

some criticism. But we are amazed and disappointed that professionals

cannot identify the positive value of a story that so clearly identifies

PR as what it so often is: merely the messenger. ’Your headline should

have said that 75% of PR pros don’t lie,’ said another CEO. Is it any

wonder that this industry has a reputation for spin?



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