Low-Power Radio Coalition turns up PR volume in its fight against NAB

WASHINGTON, DC: Attempting to mobilize support for the continued existence of low-power stations, PR pros for the Low-Power Radio Coalition (LPRC) have revved up a guerrilla PR effort - and the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) has found itself squarely in the cross-hairs.

WASHINGTON, DC: Attempting to mobilize support for the continued existence of low-power stations, PR pros for the Low-Power Radio Coalition (LPRC) have revved up a guerrilla PR effort - and the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) has found itself squarely in the cross-hairs.

WASHINGTON, DC: Attempting to mobilize support for the continued

existence of low-power stations, PR pros for the Low-Power Radio

Coalition (LPRC) have revved up a guerrilla PR effort - and the National

Association of Broadcasters (NAB) has found itself squarely in the

cross-hairs.



The LPRC is attempting to present low-power radio as an alternative to

conventional AM and FM outlets. The NAB, however, claims that low-power

signals will interfere with conventional broadcast signals.



The PR battle has thus become a David-and-Goliath scenario, as low-power

stations tend to be small outlets with limited reach, such as college

radio stations. Few stations are currently operated on low power due to

existing regulations, but the FCC proposed last year to allow more

low-power stations to operate legally.



’If this proposal moves forward, then there will be a lot more local

media platforms to get messages out,’ said Michael Bracy, an associate

in the DC government affairs shop of Bracy Williams, who also serves as

executive director of the LPRC.



The LPRC is employing a wide range of PR tactics. The group has been

using the Web to reach alternative weeklies, while musicians have given

performances on behalf of the cause. Additionally, a recent ad sponsored

by DC-based coalition supporter the Media Access Project and San

Francisco advertising agency Public Media Center trumpeted the NAB’s

lofty dollars 5 million annual lobbying budget.



Following an April setback in the House of Representatives (which passed

legislation containing the Dingell-Wilson amendment, which low-power

proponents claim will cut back on the FCC’s proposal), the LPRC is

girding up for a Senate fight. Sen. Judd Gregg is sponsoring legislation

that the LPRC claims will take low-power radio off the air entirely.



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