Analysis: Political PR - Where are they now? Rudy’s staff moves on - When New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani abruptly ended his Senate campaign, he left an entire campaign staff in the lurch in the midst of an election season. But as Rachel Van Don

Life after Rudy is liberating. At least that’s the refrain being repeated by veterans of the former New York City Mayor’s short-lived Senate campaign as they hunt for new jobs in the midst of a high-stakes election season.

Life after Rudy is liberating. At least that’s the refrain being repeated by veterans of the former New York City Mayor’s short-lived Senate campaign as they hunt for new jobs in the midst of a high-stakes election season.

Life after Rudy is liberating. At least that’s the refrain being

repeated by veterans of the former New York City Mayor’s short-lived

Senate campaign as they hunt for new jobs in the midst of a high-stakes

election season.



The mayor’s top campaign aides, including former campaign manager Bruce

Teitelbaum, media consultant Adam Goodman and pollster Frank Luntz, were

left unexpectedly jobless in the wake of Mayor Giuliani’s decision to

withdraw from the contest against first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton in

order to tend to his failing marriage and to seek treatment for prostate

cancer.



But campaign insiders say several top aides are pursuing opportunities

with leading PR agencies, while others have informal working

relationships with the campaign of Giuliani’s successor in the Senate

contest, Long Island Rep. Rick Lazio.



Goodman, for example, a longtime Giuliani friend who worked on his 1997

mayoral contest, is said to be planning a permanent exit from politics

and is ’shopping his name around to major PR agencies nationally,’

according to one insider.



Is there life after Rudy?



’I’m talking to a lot of people, and a lot of people are talking to

me.



But right now there are nothing more than discussions,’ the veteran

media guru tells PRWeek. ’It’s difficult to completely piece together

life after Rudy in a couple of weeks. Rudy in itself is a life

experience.’



Like other Giuliani campaign veterans, Goodman forfeited other

high-profile business to sign on for the Senate race of the millennium,

meaning he is now forced to pitch candidates and clients mid-cycle.



’Life after Rudy is different, but it has been fairly exciting,’ Goodman

says, adding that he had just inked his fifth deal with a Congressional

candidate and was still consulting for the New York Republican party, as

well as embarking on some Internet-related projects. ’I think a lot of

people got a lift because of working around and with Rudy.’



No one more so than Teitelbaum, the mayor’s former chief of staff who

had never run a national campaign before taking the reins of Giuliani

for Senate. By all accounts, Teitelbaum, a former Democrat, could be the

campaign’s most valuable commodity given his close ties to the mayor and

the campaign’s success, particularly in the fund-raising department.



His wife, Suri Kasirer, a Democratic public relations consultant and

lobbyist, could certainly help him out.



’He’s fielding offers all over the place,’ says one knowledgeable

source.



’He will end up making a lot of money before year’s end in spite of the

fact there’s no longer a campaign. He’s certainly one of the top three

most influential folks in New York.’



In fact, Teitelbaum has not jumped ship yet, according to sources.

Campaign insiders say Teitelbaum is still running the mayor’s political

network, which includes a federal and state PAC, as well as his inactive

Senate campaign committee, ’Friends of Giuliani.’ An attorney,

Teitelbaum is also said to have been interviewing with several

Washington-based law firms and political consulting agencies.



The former Giuliani campaign chief is nurturing a cozy relationship with

the Lazio campaign, talking daily on the phone with Lazio campaign

manager Bill Dal Col. Although there were initial reports of a rocky

transition, the Giuliani campaign and the mayor himself are now said to

be doing everything they can to help Lazio, including renting out their

prized mailing lists, which were responsible for raking in a record

dollars 20 million.



’We’re working very closely with Bill Dal Col and with other people in

the Lazio campaign. I think we’ve been very, very helpful,’ Teitelbaum

says. ’The mayor has said he will do whatever is asked of him.’ Confirms

Dal Col, ’Bruce has been extremely helpful. He couldn’t be any more

helpful.



He has been nothing short of awesome, and the mayor the same. They’ve

done everything they can possibly do to help us whenever we’ve requested

it.’





Lazy Lazio?



But some Giuliani veterans complained the Lazio campaign hasn’t taken

full advantage of their resources, such as months of opposition research

on the first lady and strategy memos. ’I spent a year and a half

thinking about this race as a strategist, and I never had a single

conversation (with Lazio),’ says one peeved former aide. ’It’s their

prerogative.’



Veteran New York political consultant Hank Sheinkopf says that former

Giuliani campaign aides may be hurt in their pursuit of other

opportunities because of the insular nature of the campaign.



’The problem is the Giuliani campaign didn’t have statewide legs,’

Sheinkopf says. ’He was always seen as a closed shop, and anything that

happens in New York is more parochial generally than anything that

happens anywhere else. It would be very hard to break out and form a

national company.’



But 36-year-old Rick Wilson is doing just that. Wilson, who worked with

Goodman at his Florida-based ’Victory Group’ for five years before

becoming a top aide to Giuliani, is striking out to form his own

consulting and public affairs firm, which is unnamed as of yet.



Wilson has already signed a few clients: he is doing communications work

for Republican National Committee co-chairwoman Pat Harrison and

advising state legislative candidates in Florida, as well as working

with three NY-based corporate clients, although he wouldn’t divulge any

names. ’I will miss Rudy tremendously because he’s such a unique

character in American political life,’ Wilson says. ’But I also feel

liberated in a way. There is no such training like New York for

high-intensity politics at any level.’



Two other former Giuliani aides now in high demand are Laura Van Hove,

the finance director who is likely to be a senior Lazio consultant -

although there is no contract yet - and communications director Juleanna

Glover, who interviewed with the Lazio campaign but is looking to move

back to Washington and possibly join a major PR firm.



As for Luntz, insiders say the GOP polling guru is, once again, focusing

on his corporate clients, such as investment banking giant Merrill

Lynch.





But the man behind ex-House Speaker Newt Gingrich’s ’Contract with

America’ is never far from the political arena: he is hosting a series

of focus groups being aired on MSNBC’s The News with Brian Williams and

is planning to embark on a national focus group tour in July to get

footage for a special fall program to be called 1,000 Voices in 100

Days. So it seems there is life after Rudy after all, and a good one at

that.



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