Tales from Tinseltown: Contract with America: let us blow you up, we’ll send you Leo

So Daily Variety is calling The Perfect Storm’s win over The Patriot a ’stunning upset’? C’mon, I called that one weeks ago. Seemed pretty obvious.

So Daily Variety is calling The Perfect Storm’s win over The Patriot a ’stunning upset’? C’mon, I called that one weeks ago. Seemed pretty obvious.

So Daily Variety is calling The Perfect Storm’s win over The

Patriot a ’stunning upset’? C’mon, I called that one weeks ago. Seemed

pretty obvious.



Maybe the so-called experts were expecting a surge of 4th of July

patriotism to douse the storm. Sorry, but Independence Day (the holiday,

not the movie) is really not about reflecting on the past. It’s a

celebration of hot dogs, beaches and the sheer joy of blowing things

up.



I’m thinking a lot about Americanism lately - not just because of the

4th of July, but because of a recent encounter I had with a journalist

interested in visiting the set of the movie I’m handling in Prague. We

chatted amicably over tea at a quaint cafe. On the surface, it was a

typical meeting between a publicist and journalist, but there was an

underlying issue present that was as difficult to ignore as the singing

German tourists outside: she is from a country that was bombed last year

by my country.



Her name is Galya, and before moving to Prague eight months ago, she

lived with her family in Belgrade. Until her home was damaged by the

same bomb that demolished the Chinese embassy.



I’d never before met someone so directly affected by US military

action.



I found myself wanting to apologize for what happened, although I still

believe the bombing campaign was justified. But it’s a different kettle

of fish when you stare into the eyes (and quite lovely eyes at that) of

an innocent who has suffered at the hands of your own government. It

becomes personalized.



Which brings me, finally, to my point. Despite our political and

national differences, Galya and I came together over a personality: a

Very Big Star.



Despite what people across the globe may think of the US as a whole,

they love and adore our movie stars. The personalities of our screen

idols rise above any negativity that international audiences may have

toward our government and our global stranglehold on socioeconomic

affairs.



Galya holds no great affection for the US government, yet she remains a

big fan of our entertainment industry and its stars. They suffer no

backlash. They are the best PR our country has.



As legions of Hollywood publicists work to build America’s next Very Big

Star, they are also building a future US ambassador of goodwill: the

next face of America to be presented to the world. And YOU get to vote -

at the box office.



Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to try to catch a fireworks display

on CNN. Then I’m going to watch a movie financed by the Germans, made in

France, starring English actors, with Czech subtitles. Or maybe I’ll

just see Gladiator again.





Lawrence Mitchell Garrison is an LA-based freelance publicist and

writer.



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