MEDIA: Media Watch - Fox taps Mexico’s optimism - and media’s attention

On July 2, Mexico peacefully voted to oust the world’s longest-ruling political party in favor of Vicente Fox, a reformist, pro-business candidate from the PAN party. Because modern Mexico has never had any other party other than the PRI in power over the past 71 years, the media described the event as nothing short of a revolution. In fact, The Washington Post (July 5) wrote that Fox’s election marks ’the first peaceful transfer of power from one party to another since the Spanish conquest 500 years ago.’

On July 2, Mexico peacefully voted to oust the world’s longest-ruling political party in favor of Vicente Fox, a reformist, pro-business candidate from the PAN party. Because modern Mexico has never had any other party other than the PRI in power over the past 71 years, the media described the event as nothing short of a revolution. In fact, The Washington Post (July 5) wrote that Fox’s election marks ’the first peaceful transfer of power from one party to another since the Spanish conquest 500 years ago.’

On July 2, Mexico peacefully voted to oust the world’s

longest-ruling political party in favor of Vicente Fox, a reformist,

pro-business candidate from the PAN party. Because modern Mexico has

never had any other party other than the PRI in power over the past 71

years, the media described the event as nothing short of a revolution.

In fact, The Washington Post (July 5) wrote that Fox’s election marks

’the first peaceful transfer of power from one party to another since

the Spanish conquest 500 years ago.’



While some media reports focused on the future of the PRI, CARMA

monitored coverage of the Fox administration’s plans for the future of

Mexico. The most frequently cited item on his agenda was his efforts to

fight the endemic corruption that has plagued Mexico for decades. Among

the moves Fox outlined was a plan to completely overhaul Mexico’s

federal police, creating an apolitical department independent of the

Ministry of the Interior and the attorney general. Fox pledged, ’With

this process, which is dramatic and deep, we will confront what has

become one of the gravest problems in this country, which is corruption,

impunity and organized crime’ (Newsday, July 5).



The media took note of Fox’s long-term proposal to expand NAFTA into a

North American Common Market, with the free flow of labor and, in a few

decades, a common currency. However, reports suggested Washington did

not agree with that policy, and Fox acknowledged that such an event

would have to wait until the income gap between the US, Canada and

Mexico was narrowed. A variety of activities were outlined for raising

foreign investment and increasing Mexico’s annual economic growth to

fight poverty in an effort for the Common Market idea to become a real

possibility.



The media observed that Fox’s advocacy of a multilateral approach to

fighting drugs differed from America’s unilateral certification

program.



But the media portrayed Fox’s approach as pragmatic, aimed at reducing

both supply and demand. ’I don’t think that any country individually can

solve this cancer. It has to be a coordinated international effort,’ Fox

told reporters (Boston Globe, July 5).



Media reports also highlighted the United States’ interest in the

political stability and economic development of Mexico, our

second-largest trading partner. Articles pointed out that in addition to

the dollars 300 billion in annual trade between the two countries, we

share a 1,900-mile border and common interests in both fighting drug

trafficking and stemming the flow of illegal immigrants. CBS (July 5)

reported, ’(If Fox can achieve his goal of 7% growth per year,) experts

believe problems like corruption and runaway immigration will have a way

of diminishing by themselves.’



The media also reported that Fox’s peaceful electoral victory was good

news for investors. Articles observed that the Mexican stock market

surged to a new high following the election, with investors said to be

pleased with the orderly transition.



While Fox has his work cut out for him, Mexico appears optimistic. Fox

will have six years to enact his agenda, but reports are indicating it

will be a step in the right direction even if he is only partially

successful in implementing his ambitious objectives.



Evaluation and analysis by CARMA. Media Watch can be found at

www.carma.com.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.