Episcopal Church brings in communications director

NEW YORK: The highest power that most PR practitioners answer to is the public, but Daniel England, the Episcopal Church's first director of communications, will have to oblige an even more formidable authority.

NEW YORK: The highest power that most PR practitioners answer to is the public, but Daniel England, the Episcopal Church's first director of communications, will have to oblige an even more formidable authority.

NEW YORK: The highest power that most PR practitioners answer to is the public, but Daniel England, the Episcopal Church's first director of communications, will have to oblige an even more formidable authority.

Appropriately, England's background spans both the secular and the spiritual worlds. An experienced PR consultant with an international background, England is also an ordained minister in the American Baptist Church. He took his new job two weeks ago.

England said, 'I've been thinking for some time that it would make a lot of sense to close the circle and bring together an extensive background in theological training with what I learned about communications in the corporate world.'

England's previous PR experience includes developing and implementing internal communications strategies for Texaco, both in the UK and the US. Most recently, he was a consultant with Ogilvy PR Worldwide, working on a brand launch in the UK.

English plans to increase the church's electronic communications resources.

Among the PR challenges he will face is the church's ongoing struggle to ensure the ordination of women in all dioceses, and protests by gay activists who demand full inclusiveness.

The church held its general convention in Denver last July, amid vigils and protests by an interfaith gay group known as Soulforce. The night before the convention, 73 demonstrators were arrested while demanding equal treatment in ordination rights for gays and lesbians.

The church's Special Committee 25 was appointed to deal with all issues of sexuality. It passed a resolution in July calling for a teaching and study guide on the sin of 'heterosexism,' discriminating against non-heterosexuals.

Episcopal leaders voted to allow women to become priests in 1976 but the church is still facing problems with bishops and dioceses that have resisted admitting women as candidates, specifically in Fort Worth, TX, Quincy, IL and San Joaquin, CA.

A resolution was passed at the convention that calls for monitoring of the three dioceses as they move towards full acceptance of female clergy members.





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