Monster.com triples PR budget for Job Shadow Day

WASHINGTON, DC: Putting money where its future business lies, job career Web site Monster.com is using Ogilvy PR to heighten visibility for Job Shadow Day 2001.

WASHINGTON, DC: Putting money where its future business lies, job career Web site Monster.com is using Ogilvy PR to heighten visibility for Job Shadow Day 2001.

WASHINGTON, DC: Putting money where its future business lies, job career Web site Monster.com is using Ogilvy PR to heighten visibility for Job Shadow Day 2001.

The name refers to Groundhog Day, on which legend holds that a groundhog comes out of its hole and looks for its shadow to determine if there will be an early spring or extended winter. Job Shadow Day on Feb 2 will be the start of a six week program that encourages students to shadow career mentors.

Ogilvy will be working with a dollars 400,000 budget, representing a threefold increase over a smaller pilot program that Monster.com attempted last year. Advertising is slated for a similar increase.

As Ogilvy VP of public education Ed Grocholski explains, 'There is a huge issue with workforce development. We need to introduce kids so they can get information about what careers demand in terms of preparation.'

PR plans call for a slow build starting in December. Ogilvy will concentrate on local initiatives.

The Job Shadow Day program started in 1998 as a joint effort between America's Promise, Junior Achievement, the National School-to-Work Office and the American Society of Association Executives. Using the Monster.com Web site, students will be able to engage in virtual job shadowing of 50 careers, including PR and marketing.

Monster.com claims a database of 9.1 million job seekers, within its site that serves as a general work portal.



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