ELECTION 2000: Bush, Gore keep post-vote posture

NEW YORK: Unprecedented PR challenges faced the communications staff of both presidential campaigns in the uncertain days following the election.

NEW YORK: Unprecedented PR challenges faced the communications staff of both presidential campaigns in the uncertain days following the election.

NEW YORK: Unprecedented PR challenges faced the communications staff of both presidential campaigns in the uncertain days following the election.

George W. Bush, who as PRWeek went to print seemed well on his way to an electoral victory despite a loss of the popular vote, chose to maintain a winner's posture, perpetuating the confidence and swagger his campaign had assumed in its final days.

Al Gore, however, chose to maintain silence, breaking it only to stress his support of the 'process.' PRWeek's calls to Gore headquarters in Nashville yielded only anonymous proclamations that 'the campaign is over and there is no longer any strategy to speak of.'

All of this reflects the comments of Leslie Dach, vice chairman of Edelman PR, who served as a strategic advisor to the Gore campaign. 'Right now, the challenge is to present an image of allegiance to the system and express thanks to the voters,' he said.

Each candidate's sole public appearance last Wednesday illustrated the differences between the two approaches. Governor Bush all but declared himself the winner in Florida. Gore, who deliberately spoke at a podium lacking the customary vice presidential seal in hopes of making himself appear more presidential, proclaimed his 'full faith and confidence in the electoral process.'



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