LAST CALL: Hacks' suspicion has Gore in a spin

Should Al Gore not make it to the Oval Office, one line of work he would do well to decline pursuing is media relations. It's not that Al isn't personally credible as a spokesperson - rather that journalists have a tendency to be a bit dubious about who is on the other end of the receiver.

Should Al Gore not make it to the Oval Office, one line of work he would do well to decline pursuing is media relations. It's not that Al isn't personally credible as a spokesperson - rather that journalists have a tendency to be a bit dubious about who is on the other end of the receiver.

Should Al Gore not make it to the Oval Office, one line of work he would do well to decline pursuing is media relations. It's not that Al isn't personally credible as a spokesperson - rather that journalists have a tendency to be a bit dubious about who is on the other end of the receiver.

In the midst of his battle over the Florida vote, the VP took it upon himself to do his own media relations offensive, calling up Miami Herald editorial pages editor Tom Fiedler only to have a disbelieving Fiedler almost refuse to take the call.

The way The Washington Post reported it, while Gore was winding down his spiel, Fiedler told Bill Clinton's number two that he had 'very nearly hung up on you' and then asked if other journalists had done so. In fact, it was Tipper Gore who had to get on the line to convince Fiedler that the call was no prank.

But at least he got through. Gore then conceded that The LA Times had stopped the conversation before he could start to deliver his spin. Hark, what's that? The sound of an entire newsdesk kicking itself?



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