Georgians still up in the air over new flag

ATLANTA: The State of Georgia sought to close a dark chapter in its history last week, after one of the toughest PR battles over a single piece of legislation.

ATLANTA: The State of Georgia sought to close a dark chapter in its history last week, after one of the toughest PR battles over a single piece of legislation.

ATLANTA: The State of Georgia sought to close a dark chapter in its history last week, after one of the toughest PR battles over a single piece of legislation.

Governor Roy Barnes, a Democrat, shocked the state legislature and introduced a bill to accept a redesign of the state flag that some said reduced the importance of the old Confederate battle emblem on the banner to an historical anecdote.

Many arguments were played out in the press. Opponents argued the battle emblem represented the honor of fallen ancestors who fought and died in the Civil War, America's bloodiest conflict. Others tried to debunk assertions that the Civil War was about slavery and dismissed charges that the flag represented racial oppression. Still others argued that it symbolized state rights over federalism, a favorite Republican party theme, and thus retained social relevance.

The Governor and his followers were charged with capitulating to economic blackmail by Civil Rights organizations and the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The NCAA suggested it might boycott Georgia and move the Atlantic Coast Conference college basketball tournament from Atlanta if the Confederate banner still flew. The event is worth dollars 35-dollars 40 million to the local economy.



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