PR WEEK AWARDS 2001: Editor's Message

It gives me great pleasure to introduce the commemorative supplement for the PRWeek Awards 2001. This is a showcase of the winning entries, with highlights of the best PR campaigns in 19 categories, as well as the year's most outstanding personal and business achievements.

It gives me great pleasure to introduce the commemorative supplement for the PRWeek Awards 2001. This is a showcase of the winning entries, with highlights of the best PR campaigns in 19 categories, as well as the year's most outstanding personal and business achievements.

It gives me great pleasure to introduce the commemorative supplement for the PRWeek Awards 2001. This is a showcase of the winning entries, with highlights of the best PR campaigns in 19 categories, as well as the year's most outstanding personal and business achievements.

The PRWeek Awards are about the best of PR. Even if you didn't win, you can be assured that you were in distinguished company. With over 1,000 entries, in only 34 categories, just to make it to the finals was a superb achievement. In fact, the general standard of entries was extremely high, with several of my personal favorites - including the launch of Heinz Green Ketchup, and Amazon's launch strategy for the latest Harry Potter book - not even making it to the finals.

With so much competition, then, it's hard to win a PRWeek Award. And that's the way it should be. Winning a PRWeek Award really means something.

And we intend to keep it that way - only the very best can claim to have won a PRWeek Award.

We're proud of the support that the industry has given to the PRWeek Awards, and the ideals that they stand for. This year's competition saw a 25% increase in the number of entries, and entrants included an incredible array of blue chip companies and household names.

We're also proud that the results of the PRWeek Awards underscore the fact that you don't have to be a big, multinational brand - or a large agency - to be the best in your class. Among the roster of winners were several local and regional campaigns, including a crisis campaign for California tomato growers and the launch of a music museum in Seattle. And I won't forget the guerrilla PR campaign by the small agency OutCast Communications for hi-tech start-up salesforce.com, which took on industry giants like Oracle and Siebel and achieved truly stunning results.

I cannot let this opportunity pass without thanking our esteemed panel of judges. We assembled an incredibly distinguished collection of judges, including senior practitioners on both the corporate and agency side, and also - for the first time - business school professors, journalists, branding experts and management consultants (see page 76). In particular, I want to thank Howard Rubenstein for his outstanding contribution as chairman. We were honored to have the benefit of Howard's wide-ranging experience.

I would also like to thank the generous and loyal sponsors (see page 5) who helped to make this evening such a lavish celebration of PR.

And finally, I would like to thank everyone who entered the PRWeek Awards.

There must always be losers as well as winners, and I want to commiserate with those who didn't quite make it. We hope that this celebratory supplement will provide clues and inspiration for next year's Awards. We hope to see you then. In the meantime, here's to a great year of PR in 2001.



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