Navy tragedy to force PR rethink

WASHINGTON: One of the Pentagon's most widely used PR programs is under threat, following the collision between the Navy submarine USS Greeneville with a Japanese fishing boat. Nine Japanese died as a result of the accident.

WASHINGTON: One of the Pentagon's most widely used PR programs is under threat, following the collision between the Navy submarine USS Greeneville with a Japanese fishing boat. Nine Japanese died as a result of the accident.

WASHINGTON: One of the Pentagon's most widely used PR programs is under threat, following the collision between the Navy submarine USS Greeneville with a Japanese fishing boat. Nine Japanese died as a result of the accident.

Soon after the incident it was revealed that 16 civilians had been aboard the submarine, taking part in a stock tour of the facility. Two guests were actually manning steering positions when it happened, under supervision by Navy crew members.

A Navy spokesman confirmed the tours are commonly used to showcase the service to government officials, business leaders and the media. The Navy has now launched a review of the civilian tour policy.

In a related move, the US Army has temporarily suspended its civilian tours of aircraft, tanks and other military vehicles.

The National Transportation Safety Board has heard evidence from a crewman assigned to track area vessels who said he was distracted by the visitors and did not finish his job.



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