Rove seeks Hollywood aid in battle against terrorism

LOS ANGELES: White House senior advisor Karl Rove met with

Hollywood's movers and shakers on November 11 to solicit their support

in the war against terrorism.



Executives from most of the major film studios gathered for an

unprecedented 90-minute conference over the weekend. Among them were

Sherry Lansing, chairperson of Paramount Pictures' Motion Picture Group,

Jack Valenti, president and CEO of the Motion Picture Association of

America, Jonathan Dolgen, chairman of Viacom Entertainment Group, and

Robert Iger, president of the Walt Disney Company.



Also present were members of the music industry, including Recording

Industry Association of America president and CEO Hilary Rosen, and

representatives from the guilds and unions that power show business.



Rove, who heads the president's propaganda efforts, asked the group to

help the government spread a six-part message both domestically and

abroad.



According to Daily Variety, points of that message discussed at the

meeting were that current US efforts are aimed against terrorism, not

Islam; America's business leaders should provide a rallying cry for

service; the public should support service-persons and their families;

the war is a battle against evil; September 11 was an attack on the free

world and all nations should take part in the response; and that

children and families need extra attention and reassurance.



Rove also stressed that the White House isn't trying to control content,

but invoked WWII press involvement as a model.



Two plans of action came out of the meeting. First, copies of first-run

films will be sent to US personnel serving abroad beginning as soon as

this week. PSAs produced by Hollywood were also discussed.



Daily Variety also reported that Hollywood lobbyists are scheduled to

meet with the White House this week to talk about further plans. The

Hollywood-DC alliance may prove extremely beneficial to show business,

which Congress targeted only a year ago for marketing R-rated films to

minors, and which has not had a warm relationship with the Bush

administration.



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