Heisman Trophy publicity doesn't help players win

Let's say you're opening your mail. You open an envelope containing nothing but a single leaf. The next day, another envelope arrives, this one boasting a necktie with a picture of some guy named 'Ty.' You begin to wonder if you've upset the wrong person.

Let's say you're opening your mail. You open an envelope containing nothing but a single leaf. The next day, another envelope arrives, this one boasting a necktie with a picture of some guy named 'Ty.' You begin to wonder if you've upset the wrong person.

There is a rational explanation, though: it's Heisman Trophy season.

Hypothetically, the leaf should have made you think about Washington State quarterback Ryan Leaf; and the tie, about Brigham Young quarterback Ty Detmer.

Each year, university sports information directors coordinate PR campaigns designed to boost the award prospects of their star football player. The problem? Nobody knows exactly who the voters are.

Hence university PR pros revert to showering unsuspecting sports journalists with player-related freebies and 'for your consideration' postcards.

The irony is that their efforts are largely wasted on the electorate.

'I vote by what I see on the field, and so does everyone else,' said one voter.

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