Diary: Fenway may just hit one out of park

Move over David Letterman. Historic Massachusetts, a preservation group, has issued a top-10 list of its own, with a much more ambitious twist.

Move over David Letterman. Historic Massachusetts, a preservation group, has issued a top-10 list of its own, with a much more ambitious twist.

Move over David Letterman. Historic Massachusetts, a preservation

group, has issued a top-10 list of its own, with a much more ambitious

twist.



The organization has added Boston’s legendary Fenway Park, home since

1912 to the star-crossed Red Sox, to its list of endangered

landmarks.



The group wants to save Fenway from being replaced by a more modern

ballpark - one, say, boasting better sightlines and seats wide enough to

accommodate fans weighing more than 100 pounds.



Margaret Dyson, president of Historic Massachusetts, admitted that

Fenway was an unusual addition to the list, which includes lesser-known

landmarks such as schoolhouses, covered bridges, theaters and dairy

farms.



Can the backing of Historic Massachusetts really save the ballpark?



’Physically, the answer is yes, said Dyson. ’But in terms of whether

there is the will to do it by politicians and the business community, I

don’t know.’



If the organization’s track record is any indication, Fenway will remain

where it is - Historic Massachusetts has lost only three of its past 70

sites listed for demolition or deterioration.



If only the Red Sox had such an impressive record.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.