Police group hires Klores for dollars 120k NYC image work

NEW YORK: The Patrolman’s Benevolent Association of New York City has turned to PR not only to tweak public perception of the city’s officers, but also to foster better communication between the labor group and its members.

NEW YORK: The Patrolman’s Benevolent Association of New York City has turned to PR not only to tweak public perception of the city’s officers, but also to foster better communication between the labor group and its members.

NEW YORK: The Patrolman’s Benevolent Association of New York City

has turned to PR not only to tweak public perception of the city’s

officers, but also to foster better communication between the labor

group and its members.



The organization, which represents 27,000 police officers, earlier this

month awarded Dan Klores Associates (DKA) a one-year, dollars 10,000 per

month contract for image enhancement, crisis communications and media

relations.



The assignment comes in the wake of PBA members electing their first new

board in 18 years - a contentious process that saw a group of insurgents

challenge and eventually triumph over the organization’s existing

leadership.



While DKA had advised the insurgents in the months leading up to their

election, the awarding of the PR business was an open process during

which the PBA advertised for PR firms.



DKA SVP Vito A. Turso said the agency will attempt to re-define ’the

public image of the New York City officer as portrayed by their union.’

Indeed, if there’s any group that may need a PR boost, it’s New York

cops.



Despite statistics showing that crime has decreased across the board and

an overall perception that the city is safer than any time since the

1960s, the NYPD is still saddled with an image of being ’above the law’

and racist.



Last February, Amadou Diallo, an African immigrant, was killed by four

white police officers who mistakenly thought he had a gun. The officers,

who fired 41 shots and hit Diallo 19 times, have been charged with

second-degree murder and will be tried starting on January 3.



Additionally, the department’s image is still feeling the aftereffects

of an 1997 incident in which officer Justin Volpe brutalized crime

suspect Abner Louima as others reportedly looked on. A recently

concluded criminal trial saw only one of the participants convicted,

with Volpe changing his plea to guilty during the proceedings.



Turso said these incidents are obviously not indicative of the force as

a whole, which he believes has been misrepresented over the years.



’Crime is down - who got it there?’ he asked rhetorically.



He added that the new PBA leadership will continue to increase

interaction with its members, a strategy born during the days leading up

to their election. The old board, Turso claimed, rarely bothered to

communicate with the officers it purported to represent.



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