Why not let Pippa have her party?

Is the bubble about to burst for royal cheeky girl Pippa Middleton?

Ian Monk: 'Telling Pippa to cut out what she does could be dangerous and curmudgeonly strategy. Pippa mania is harmless fun.'
Ian Monk: 'Telling Pippa to cut out what she does could be dangerous and curmudgeonly strategy. Pippa mania is harmless fun.'

She of the saucy smile and the endlessly captioned bottom is suddenly, according to the socially well-connected Mail on Sunday, being asked by members of the enjoined Windsor and Middleton clans to lower what some fear could become an embarrassing profile.

Apparently causing consternation are her guileless books and articles on how to make life a party and her endless appearances at society and sporting events, coupled with a perceived propensity to lend commercial endorsement to whatever she does.

According to another story last week, royal lawyers warned off the writers of spoof diaries published on Twitter and in book form. Parodying Pippa, a girl happy to laugh at herself, is now officially legally hazardous.

All of which is a great shame and a potential PR trap.

When William married Kate it seemed the image-makers had been gifted the perfect script to avoid another Diana disaster. William's mother was left painfully alone to face the media spotlight. By contrast Kate brought to the altar common sense, strong family support and - like manna from PR heaven - an alter ego.

The marginally more risque lookalike Pippa seemed the ideal lightning conductor to divert media bolts away from a sister whose image was rooted in discretion, duty and reticence. The 'fun-loving' elements could be assigned to the matching spares, Pippa and Harry, to handle with relish and humour.

'You look hot,' he told her at William and Kate's wedding: the nation loved it.

Now, partly because of Britain's uneasy animosity towards those who prosper financially or get 'above themselves', Pippa is told to rein in her public persona.

'Cashing in' is a phrase taken up with zest by a media skilled at creating headlines demolishing those it has built up. Telling Pippa to cut out what she does could be a dangerous and curmudgeonly strategy. Pippa mania is harmless fun and she is a perfect icon for the age.

We should toast her in Pimms, not excoriate her for endorsing it. Bottoms up, Pippa.

Ian Monk is founder of Ian Monk Associates and a former executiveat the Daily Mail and The Sun

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