INTERNATIONAL: PRAP is set to replace WSW as Boeing agency in Japan

TOKYO: Boeing, the world's largest aerospace and defence group, is

in the final stages of appointing a new corporate agency in Japan after

eight years of working with Weber Shandwick Worldwide.



The aerospace group undertook the review to address different needs

after the company refocused its business along the lines of six business

divisions earlier this year.



Japan's second largest PR agency, PRAP, is on the verge of winning the

corporate brief to promote all of the new business units in the country

from 1 January. WSW's brief covered only its commercial airplanes

division.



Boeing Japan director of corporate communications Naoko Masuda said:

'PRAP will be handling almost everything, from strategic planning to

media relations, as I'm the only communications person for Boeing in

Japan.'



PRAP made it to the final stages against Burson-Marsteller in a review

that included incumbent WSW.



PRAP executive V-P Satoshi Sugita is set to lead the account with a team

headed by director of communications services Janniss Yang.



Masuda said a final proposal for fees on the account was under

discussion.



'Boeing is trying to transform itself. Commercial airplanes is still an

important part of our business but we also need to promote our new

business units,' she said.



Boeing recently lost out to Lockheed Martin in a £1.9bn bid to

supply the US military with next-generation communications satellite

systems.



The group announced in August it was searching for a comms director for

China following the promotion of Tom Maclean (PRWeek, 3 August).



Maclean relocated to the US in September, reporting to Boeing

vice-president of international comms Matthew de la Haye, and SVP of

international relations Thomas Pickering.



Boeing is also pitching for a UK PR agency, with incumbent APCO one of

four agencies in the running (PRWeek, 26 October).



The group has been forced to shed staff following the 11 September

attacks and downturn in the market, with more than 30,000 employees

being laid off.



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.