MEDIA: Radio 5 Live editors switch roles in news team reshuffle

BBC talk station Radio 5 Live has reshuffled its team of news

editors.



Six of the station's daily news strands will now have new editors,

including the flagship show 5 Live Breakfast.



The revamp is part of a drive by newly recruited head of news Ceri

Thomas to broaden the appeal of its current affairs programming and

include more workplace, technology, entertainment and family issues on

the news agenda (PRWeek, 19 October).



Thomas told PRWeek when he was promoted in October, after serving as

editor of 5 Live Breakfast, that he feared the station's news was too

Whitehall-focused and was missing the opportunity for 'clever, niche

ideas'.



Sali Collins, editor of Simon Mayo, has replaced Thomas as editor of 5

Live Breakfast and Mark Sandall moves from being Nicky Campbell's editor

for the last four years to take the helm on Simon Mayo.



He has been replaced by Jon Zilkha, who already works on the show as

assistant editor.



Other appointments are Richard Jackson as editor of Drive, Robin Britten

to edit lunchtime news round-up programme Midday and Rhian Roberts as

editor of Fi Glover.



A new role of weekend editor has been created after concern that the

weekend news team would not be able to cope with a huge rolling story

such as the 11 September terrorist atrocities.



John Cary, currently deputy editor of Radio 4's Today programme will

take up the post, overseeing all weekend news output and taking charge

of the weekend editions of Breakfast and Adrian Chiles.



Meanwhile, Seetha Kumar has been named as BBC Factual and Learning's

head of life skills for TV. The post was created in September to oversee

the delivery of education programmes across all channels.



Her remit includes health, personal and mental fitness, money

management, IT and literacy and numeracy. She is also tasked with

managing BBC production partnerships.



In a linked move, Fiona Chesterton has been appointed controller of

adult learning, tasked with finding ways to better engage 14 to

24-year-olds.



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