Cancer Research UK seeks to embolden with rebrand

Cancer Research UK is undergoing a major rebrand this September in a bid to position itself as 'bolder and less clinical', while boosting fundraising by the public.

The charity, which is celebrating its tenth anniversary, wants to move away from the ‘parent to child’ tone that characterised some of its previous marketing, to a ‘warmer’ pitch.

Richard Taylor, the executive director of fundraising and marketing, said the biggest factors were to be seen as 'more relevant’, and to ‘highlight scientific progress made in cancer’.

Having recently become a founding partner of the Francis Crick Institute, an ambitious interdisciplinary group aimed to position Britain at the vanguard of biomedical research, the charity wants to reflect its newfound confidence by changing its vision strapline from ‘Together we can beat cancer’ - which it will retain - to ‘Bringing forward the day when all cancers are cured’.

Taylor said: ‘We are at a golden era of research. At the moment, patients can expect a fairly limited treatment options. The future is treatments based on the patients’ genetic make-up.’

He added that new campaigns would centre on highlighting brand ‘heroes’ such as research scientists or people taking part in Race for Life to ‘show people they are the stakeholders in the fundraising process'.

Key to the timing is also the economic challenge posed by the recession.

Out of a total £432m fundraising income last year, £137m came from legacies, which was dependent on market factors such as housing prices - the biggest drop.

While the number of people in the UK diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime is currently one in three, and expected to rise to four in ten, Taylor said recessionary factors had meant research spending actually fell to £330m per year in 2011-12, from £355m in 2008/09.

Taylor added: ‘If we can raise more money, we can save more lives. Eighty-nine per cent of donations are £10 or less and people believe because we are a big charity we must have large donations, but the reality couldn’t be further from the truth.’

Cancer Research UK will spend £680,000 on the rebrand this year, which will include repainting 20 per cent of the charity’s 550 shops with a new logo: a series of dots forming a 'C'.

Before commenting please read our rules for commenting on articles.

If you see a comment you find offensive, you can flag it as inappropriate. In the top right-hand corner of an individual comment, you will see 'flag as inappropriate'. Clicking this prompts us to review the comment. For further information see our rules for commenting on articles.

comments powered by Disqus

Latest Articles

John Lewis to tell brand story with "tasteful" 150th anniversary celebrations

John Lewis to tell brand story with "tasteful" 150th anniversary celebrations

Department store John Lewis is to use its 150th anniversary this year to talk about its history, which "not enough people know about", according to director of communications Peter Cross.

Labour hires Obama election strategist David Axelrod to fight General Election

Labour hires Obama election strategist David Axelrod to fight General Election

The man who helped Barack Obama win the 2008 and 2012 US presidential elections is to work for Labour along with members of his team.

Sky adds Fever PR to its roster after splitting with Cake

Sky adds Fever PR to its roster after splitting with Cake

Pay-TV giant Sky has added Fever PR to its agency line-up for a wide-ranging brief covering products and services.

Max Clifford trial jury to continue deliberations after Easter break

Max Clifford trial jury to continue deliberations after Easter break

The jury in the trial of celebrity publicist Max Clifford has been sent home for Easter and will reconvene on Tuesday for further deliberations about its verdicts on 11 charges of indecent assault.

Home Office brings in Munro & Forster to campaign against FGM

Home Office brings in Munro & Forster to campaign against FGM

The Home Office has tasked Munro & Forster (M&F) with supporting its campaign to eradicate female genital mutilation (FGM) as part of a wider retained brief.