Public Affairs: Soap Box - Gill Morris, chief executive, Connect Communications

The term 'omnishambles' seems to have struck a chord. Theresa May's confusion about Abu Qatada epitomises the reason why.

Remember this is not the first time May has been confused about what she was doing. May was questioned by the Home Affairs Select Committee on the Sheikh Raed Salah affair last July and was unable to provide coherent answers relating to the Sheikh's arrest and detention.

Omnishambles encapsulates the Government's serial misadventure: granny taxes, pastygate, Come dine with Dave, Jerrycan panic and the boomeranging Budget.

May's lost day was just the icing on the cake; providing Ed Miliband with a rare opportunity to leave the coalition tarred.

Satirists will feast on a diet of omnishambles for a while, but what impact will May's forgetfulness really have on the polls and fortunes of the coalition? Is it a blip or a seismic fault?

It is important to remember May was seen as a safe pair of hands. Unfortunately, she fell victim to the Home Office curse.

In government, you must know that detail is everything. Without confidence in, or knowledge of, the detail, you are vulnerable. The truth is May can't hope to keep on top of the detail of the sprawling number of issues under her watch.

The media are now hungry for her next memory lapse - and there will be one.

Let there be no mistake, being Home Secretary is a bloody tough - maybe too tough given departmental cuts and scale - not just for May but for her predecessors too. David Blunkett, Kenneth Clarke and Jacqui Smith were all cursed. It must be time to look again at the Home Office remit rather than crucify Home Secretaries one by one?

David Cameron has remained loyal and he will continue to support beleaguered members of his Cabinet such as May.

Sadly, in the shadow of omnishambles, playing the loyalty card looks like incompetence and weakness.

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