EDITORIAL: The public would rather trust a PRO

This week's PR Week/NOP Solutions survey has served some up divine retribution on those journalists who habitually malign PROs. Because, despite the constant national media misinformation about the PR industry - let's face it, practitioners are generically portrayed as either party providers or political machinators - the public, it seems, are more likely to place their trust in the word of a PR practitioner than a journalist.

This week's PR Week/NOP Solutions survey has served some up divine retribution on those journalists who habitually malign PROs. Because, despite the constant national media misinformation about the PR industry - let's face it, practitioners are generically portrayed as either party providers or political machinators - the public, it seems, are more likely to place their trust in the word of a PR practitioner than a journalist.

Taken to extremes, this insight into public consciousness could have profound implications. For example, what is the point in diligently courting a journalist for their editorial endorsement of a message or corporate line, when the editorial filter process is likely to diminish rather than enhance trust in your client? And as public consumption of internet material rises, might not PROs be better employed talking directly to their 'publics' via that medium of information democracy?

For now, perhaps it might behove certain journalists to take a more balanced view of the industry and to refrain from biting the hand that feeds.



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