EDITORIAL: Private sector’s civil opportunity

The Labour Government’s obvious willingness to open its doors to the business community may be creating a whole new genre of community affairs - the corporation as Government agency. Microsoft is the latest in a series of well known brand names, with a virtual, if somewhat disputed, monopoly in their sector, whose community relations activity has enabled the Government to outsource areas of public information.

The Labour Government’s obvious willingness to open its doors to

the business community may be creating a whole new genre of community

affairs - the corporation as Government agency. Microsoft is the latest

in a series of well known brand names, with a virtual, if somewhat

disputed, monopoly in their sector, whose community relations activity

has enabled the Government to outsource areas of public information.



Microsoft has linked up with Leonard Cheshire, the New Deal and the DfE

in order to explain the obligations created for employers by the new

Disability Discrimination Act. The Workability project will include a

number of branded roadshows, staged by Eclat Marketing, which Microsoft

will use to explain the implications of the legislation. Having taken on

the role of Government agency, Microsoft’s decision to outsource with

the appointment of Eclat indicates that this could prove to be a

profitable generator of new business for PR and marketing agencies.

There are few in-house departments that have the resources to start

running a quasi-Governmental campaign on top of their normal day-to-day

management of reputation.



When Sky hooked up with the DfE and the Science Museum to run a school

leavers’ career advice service, last year, for example, the

implementation of the pounds 6 million community affairs programme was

handed to social marketing agency Good Business, with additional

promotion work for Red Rooster.



So who will be next in line for a Government job? With so much attention

focused on the potential negative impact of the Dome publicity for

sponsors, and the much reiterated point that the money would have been

better spent on community infrastructure, you could do worse than look

to some of the main protagonists at Greenwich.



Might we yet see UK’s best known chemist acting as a corporate buffer

between the embattled Department of Health and the less than satisfied

customers of the NHS?



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.