The Big Question: Can good PR make real fur fashionable and acceptable again?

The Countess of Wessex caused a storm in the press recently when she was photographed wearing a new hat made of real fox fur while on a business trip to the Swiss ski resort of St Moritz

The Countess of Wessex caused a storm in the press recently when

she was photographed wearing a new hat made of real fox fur while on a

business trip to the Swiss ski resort of St Moritz





JACKIE COOPER



Jackie Cooper PR



’The fashion world might like to flirt with this proposition - it often

enjoys a little controversy - but in real terms, I do not believe the

mass consumer market will be convinced. Even the best PR cannot

eradicate the knowledge that popularly exists on the horrors of the fur

trade.



People know there is no need for real fur nowadays when synthetic

alternatives exist and there is a greater support then ever before for

ethics in consumer products. The public perception of the fur trade is

still that it is cruel and unnecessary and the best PR in the world is

not going to change that on a national level.’





PATRICK ROBERTS



Abel Hadden and Co



’In the UK probably not. The animal extremists, with their massive

budgets have succeeded (dishonestly) in linking fur to cruelty in

people’s minds and intimidate any public figure who disagrees with them

Inevitably, most women are either too embarrassed or too nervous to wear

fur, even though they might want to. It would need some outstanding

fashion or style icons to risk their reputation by challenging this

mindset. Whose PR advisers would let them do this? In other countries,

fur has never gone out of fashion - either because of the climate or

because people are less woolly-minded about animal use. Let’s admit it:

on the right person, fur looks terrific.’





ROS VARNES



RSPCA



’Unfortunately, there are still people who wear fur, even though 86 per

cent of people asked by MORI recently said they wouldn’t wear it. The

RSPCA has campaigned long and hard to end fur farming in England and

Wales. In the next few weeks a Government Bill which aims to do just

that is due to reach its second reading and we’re confident it will

succeed. Our campaigns have helped to uncover the practices of the fur

farming industry, and now most people find the idea of wearing it

unacceptable. We would be surprised if there were a swing towards

wearing fur again. It has become unfashionable, and people tend to stick

by what they believe is right. All the public relations in the world

cannot save an unnecessary trade which is driven by vanity.’





JAN BROWN



British Fur Trade Association



’When the editor of British Vogue declared that ’covering fashion and

excluding fur is rather like reporting on Europe and not mentioning the

euro’, then it is official - fur is back in fashion. This fact has much

to do with the worldwide fur sector’s focus on education and product

development as well as proactive information flow and communicating

positive messages.



Programmes targeting fashion designers and students in the fashion

capitals - London, Paris, Milan and New York - are just one aspect of a

defined communications strategy by trade organisations in 31 countries

around the world and a strategic marketing push by the major fur

producers. So can PR put fur back in fashion? The answer is it already

has!’



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.