Hacked BP Twitter account will not cause major reputational problem

The hacking of BP's Twitter account was handled well by the oil giant and should not have caused it a major reputational problem, social media experts have agreed.

As BP continues its efforts to plug the leaking oil well in the Gulf of Mexico, the energy company has suffered its official Twitter site being hacked and a joke being posted to the site.
 
The offending comment remained posted for about 30 minutes before being deleted, prompting an explanatory statement from BP spokesperson Mark Salt.
 
Ketchum Pleon head of digital media Fernando Rizo said: 'It has actually done a pretty good job in terms of PR. We've seen time and time again when the reaction of a big brand to a critical blog is to send in the lawyers - that will turn something into a cause celebre.
 
'BP seems to have learnt that lesson well. Because it has acted in the way it has, we will all have forgotten about it in a week or less. It has absolutely done the right thing.'
 
1000 Heads director of engagement strategy James Whatley said 'it could have been a lot worse', adding: 'BP has only got 7,500 followers  - the only reason anyone would notice is because there are some press people following.'
 
Whatley went on: 'If BP carried out the normal process of recognising it, apologising for it, deleting the offending tweets and then getting on with saving the planet and didn't take too much time over it, I'm fairly sure it can say 'this happened, but we've got a lot on our plates at the moment'.'

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