Diary: Disability movement wheels in the big guns

While Harriet Harman’s Department of Social Security has former BBC correspondent Martin Sixsmith to help convince people that changes to disability allowance are fair, the disability movement itself has rather scant resources. However, in addition to a number of in-house teams it can also rely on the services of one consultancy PR man, cerebral palsy sufferer Ben Furner.

While Harriet Harman’s Department of Social Security has former BBC

correspondent Martin Sixsmith to help convince people that changes to

disability allowance are fair, the disability movement itself has rather

scant resources. However, in addition to a number of in-house teams it

can also rely on the services of one consultancy PR man, cerebral palsy

sufferer Ben Furner.



Furner, a senior account manager at PR firm the Grand Design and a

former in-house man at Age Concern and Scope, is acting as a spokesman

for cerebral palsy sufferers in the wake of Harman’s plans to cut back

on disability allowance for those in work.



Furner has already appeared on the Nine O’Clock News describing how

proposed cuts in allowances for the working disabled would affect him.

He reckons it taught him valuable PR lessons: ’Every PR person should

have to do put themselves in their client’s place. It’s never as easy as

it looks,’ he says.



So what chance does Furner give himself and his cause against the might

of the Government information machine? ’The Government puts up Harriet

Harman to explain welfare reform, the disability movement has me. An

unequal battle, she’s not got a chance!’



Have you registered with us yet?

Register now to enjoy more articles and free email bulletins

Register
Already registered?
Sign in

Would you like to post a comment?

Please Sign in or register.